Wednesday, September 09, 2020

A Celebration Sale

Hey all, 

I just wanted to let you know that from 9/9/20 to 9/30/20 I am having a 30% off sale on all* of my patterns on my website. This is in celebration of the Bizzy Crochet CAL Group on Facebook reaching 3,000 members over the Summer. You don't need a coupon code for this sale- so I hope you enjoy!

*excludes the 2020 Christmas CAL Ticket.

Click the picture or here to go to my website!



Wednesday, August 19, 2020

2020 Bizzy Crochet Christmas CAL Preview

HEY!! It's that time of year again! The Bizzy Crochet team is gearing up for the 2020 Christmas Crochet-Along. I know it's only August, but it starts in October and that's going to be here before you know it. 

In this post, I am sharing some basic information concerning the CAL and pictures of this year's projects!

Friday, August 14, 2020

Four Seasons Scarf Pattern

 

Four Seasons Scarf

by Elizabeth Mareno

Lacey and simple, this scarf is perfect for any season.

Kits are available for each season from Good Loops Yarn*. 

An ad-free PDF version is available for $2 on the Bizzy Crochet Website.











Materials:

Yarn:

Eco-Fusion by Nurturing Fibres

50% Bamboo/ 50% Cotton

1 skein each of 4 colors 

Hook:

F/3.75mm hook

Notes:

         ·            Each “stripe” is a full two-row repeat ending w/Row2.

         ·            If you want to follow the color-blocking for this pattern, the stripes go like this:

(Work the left column first.)

1 stripe Color B                                 1 stripe Color D

5 stripes Color A                               1 stripe Color B

3 stripes Color D                               3 stripes Color A

1 stripe Color C                                 3 stripes Color B

5 stripes Color D                               5 stripes Color C

3 stripes Color B                                5 stripes Color B

1 stripe Color C                                 1 stripe Color D

3 stripes Color D                               1 stripe Color C

1 stripe Color B                                 3 stripes Color A

3 stripes Color C                                1 stripe Color C

1 stripe Color A                                 1 stripe Color B

3 stripes Color C                                3 stripes Color A

3 stripes Color B                                3 stripes Color C

3 stripes Color C                                5 stripes Color D

5 stripes Color A                               1 stripe Color B


 Special Stitch:

Popcorn (Pc): 5dc in the next stitch, remove hook from loop, and reinsert (from front to back) in the top of the first of the 5dc, pick up the live loop and draw through the first dc, ch1.

Pattern:

Ch 42

Row1: sc in the 2nd ch from the hook, *ch1, sk3, dc in next ch, ch1, work (dc, ch1, dc) in the same ch as last dc, ch1, sk 3, sc in the next ch; repeat from * to end. (5 “fans”)

Row2: ch6 (counts as 1dc and 3ch), turn, sk 1dc, sc in next dc, *ch3, 1Pc in next sc, ch3, sk1dc, sc in next dc; repeat from * to last sc, ch3, 1dc in last sc. (4 Pc)

If you’re striping, your color changes will happen after Row 2.

Row3: ch1, turn, sc in first dc, *ch1, dc in next sc, ch1, work (dc, ch1, dc) in top of the next sc, ch1, sc in top of Pc; repeat from * ending sc in 3rd of ch6.

Row4-56: repeat rows 2 & 3.

© Bizzy Crochet and Design


 *Links marked with asterisks are affiliate links. If you use one of my links to make a purchase it won't cost you any more, but the company may give me a small bit of money back which helps me pay for the free content on my blog. Thank you for your support!

 

 

Wednesday, August 12, 2020

New Pattern- Coming Soon!


Today I am introducing you to my new Four Seasons Scarf Pattern. I am calling it that because it really can be worn all four seasons when made out of the right materials, and because I designed it using Eco-Fusion* by Nurturing Fibres to represent the four seasons in four gorgeous colorways! Eco-Fusion is a lovely, soft, and squishy 50% Bamboo/50% Cotton blend that is ethically dyed and balled in South Africa. It is a wonderful company concerned about not only conservation but also in providing jobs for locals and affecting their community in a positive manner. Plus, I don't know what they put in their dye, but their yarn has the most fantastic smell throughout the whole skein...EVERY skein. 



I am working with Good Loops Yarn*, who is a stockist for Nurturing Fibres. They are a small, woman-owned business located here in the States. Stephanie, who is their "Director of Squish" has been good enough to put kits together for each season to make it easier for you to order your favorite. Each kit has exactly the right amount of yarn to make one scarf, so there is no waste. And the yarn feels and looks like the decadent treat it is. Each kit comes out to about $26 USD. For me, that's about what I spend on a gift for Moms and Sisters, so I feel really good about being able to present you with the opportunity to buy a kit directly from Good Loops*. 



This pattern is going to be your go-to for ease and simplicity this scarf season. It uses a two-row repeat (featuring fans and popcorns) throughout that is easy to memorize. It works up so fast, I can make one in two nights of TV watching (even with changing yarn colors). It calls for a #3 light/DK yarn, so even if you're on a tight budget and you can't purchase new yarns, this is perfect for using up leftovers. You could even get away with using baby weight yarns or doubling up fingering weight.  

So, stay tuned for this weekend's pattern release!

*Links marked with asterisks are affiliate links. If you use one of my links to make a purchase it won't cost you any more, but the company may give me a small bit of money back which helps me pay for the free content on my blog. Thank you for your support!

Monday, June 15, 2020

Scrappy Squares Poncho Pattern

Scrappy Squares Poncho Pattern
by Elizabeth Mareno

Available free on this blog or purchase an Ad-free version on my website.

Poncho Front

 Poncho Back

About This Pattern: 
This fun poncho pattern started out as my Scrap-a-Long project during the COVID-19 lockdown starting in March. Every Tuesday night I held a LIVE scrap-a-long on my Bizzy Crochet Facebook page so that we all had the opportunity to have interaction with other crafters since we couldn't leave our homes. It was a wonderful time of fellowship and a needed respite for the craziness that was going on around us. 

Most of the country has opened back up now, and I decided it was time to get the poncho finished. It started out as a "let's see if we can just whip up a poncho from scraps" project and turned into an awesome design I can't wait to share with you. I opted to go with a lace pattern on the bottom, because I'm not a big fan of tassels or fringe, but I'm a sucker for a bit of lace. 

This pattern is a GREAT stash buster, and it leaves you plenty of space to personalize it. I give you the instructions for what I created, but you can definitely finish off any way you want. This is all about you! 




Materials:
#4 Worsted Weight Yarn- Used: Hobby Lobby I Love This Yarn
Neutral Color: 2 full skeins of Off White
Colors: Scrap yarn. You can use small bits to complete your squares. I would try to make sure that your scrap yarn is all the same weight as it will affect the look of your squares. 

#7/4.5mm hook
Large Eye needle for assembly

Abbreviations: US terms
ch- chain
ct(s)- count(s)
MR- magic ring
sc- single crochet (UK dc)
dc- double crochet (UK tr)
sl st- slip stitch
sk- skip (UK miss/skip)
sp- space
Picot- ch3, sl st in the first ch

Size: Side to Side- 35" x Neck to Bottom- 26"
The sizing can be adjusted by adding or subtracting the number of squares you use. 


Granny Square: Make 28
Rd 1- MR, ch3 (cts as dc), 2dc in the circle, ch2, (3dc, ch2) in circle 3 more times, join with the first dc. (12dc)

Rd 2- sl st to next corner, ch3, (2dc, ch2, 3dc) in corner, *ch1, sk 3dc, (3dc, ch2, 3dc) in next corner, repeat from * 3 times, ch1, sk last 3dc, join with first dc. (24 dc)

Rd3- sl st to next corner, ch3, (2dc, ch2, 3dc) in corner, *ch1, sk 3dc, 3dc in next ch1 sp, ch1, sk 3dc, (3dc, ch2, 3dc) in corner, repeat from * 3 times, ch1, sk 3dc, 3dc in next ch1 sp, ch1, join with first dc. (36 dc)

Rd4- ch3, dc in next 2dc, *(2dc, ch2, 2dc) in the corner, dc in each dc and ch1 sp across, repeat from * 3 times, join with first dc. (60 dc)

Scrap Color Squares: Make 28
Rd1- MR, ch3 (does not ct as dc), 16 dc in circle. join with the first dc. (16 dc)

Rd2- ch3 (does ct as dc), (dc, ch2, 2dc) in same sp as join, dc in 3, *(2dc, ch2, 2dc) in next st, dc in next 3, repeat from * 2 more times, join with first dc. Change color. (28 dc)

Rd3- w/new color, join in any corner sp w/ch3 (does ct as dc), (dc, ch2, 2dc) in the corner, *dc in each dc across, (2dc, ch2, 2dc) in the corner, repeat from * 2 more times, dc in each dc across, join with the first dc. (44 dc)

Rd4- sl st to the corner, ch3 (does ct as dc), (dc, ch2, 2dc) in the corner sp, repeat Rd2 from this point. join with the first dc. (60 dc)

NOTE: The way I make my colored squares so that they look like they belong together is I start with one color in the center (A) and another color on the outside (B). Then, for the next square, I start the center with the last squares outside color (B) and choose a new color for the outside of the new square (C). A-B, B-C, C-D, D-A...etc. I keep going this way because then it helps to tie my squares together in a complementary way and keeps the color combinations pleasing the eye. You can get away with a lot of crazy color combinations added to your project by doing it this way. 

Assembly:
Set your squares up using a checkerboard pattern. (see layout 2 pictures below)

I whipstitch my squares together from the chain one on one side of the double crochets to the chain one on the opposite side. (see picture below)

Poncho Layout should go as follows: 
Make 2 sections 4 squares x 7 rows

Then whipstitch them first at the blue line in the graph below.
(You can use any assembly technique you like. I tend to use whipstitch for a lot of my projects.)

Second, fold section A to meet section B making sure to match up your numbers.
Whipstitch them together with front sides facing.


Poncho Rough Assembly


Neckline: With Neutral 
Rd1- starting in the square immediately to the left of the center of the back, join with a ch1 in the first dc, sc in the sp, *sc in each dc and ch sp around, placing a sc dec in the front and back "points". 
DO NOT put a sc in any of the whipstitch joins. (100 sc)

Rd2- ch1, reverse sc in each sc around. 

Cut off and tuck in ends.


Bottom: With Neutral working around the base of the poncho
Rd1- (Note: do not put any stitches in the joins) starting in the back point, join with a ch1, sc in the ch sp, sc in each dc and ch sp across to the opposite point. (you should have 187 sc/side), ch2, sc in the same point, sc in each dc and ch sp across to the opposite point,  ch2, join with the first sc. 

Rd2- sl st in the next st (you should be 2 stitches away from the corner sp), ch5 (cts as dc + ch2), *[sk 2sc, dc in 3sc, ch2, sk 2sc, dc in next, ch2] across poncho until 1 stitch before the corner ch2 sp, sk 1sc, 3dc in the corner (corner group made), ch2, sk 1sc**, dc in the next sc, ch2, repeat from * once, ending with last repeat at **. join with sl st to the 3rd chain from the ch5. 

Rd3- ch1, sc in same sp, ch3, [(dc2tog, ch1, Picot, ch1, dc2tog) in the center dc of next 3dc group, ch3, sk 1dc,* sc in the next dc, ch3] around, ending the repeat at *. sl st to the first sc. 




© Bizzy Crochet and Design 2020


Friday, June 05, 2020

Slouchy Soap Saver Bag Pattern


by Elizabeth Mareno 

This pattern makes a GREAT stash-busting scrap-user-upper. If you have about an ounce of yarn, you have enough to make a soap saver bag! These make great gifts for both men and women, plus these are great for selling at craft fairs, especially if you can get yourself next to the handmade soap booth!  

Materials:
1 oz #4 worsted weight cotton (Used Hobby Lobby "I Love This Cotton")
#7/4.5mm hook
Large Eye needle for sewing ends.


Pattern:
Bag: 
R1- ch13, 2hdc in second chain from hook, hdc in next 10 chains, 4hdc in last chain. Turn to work on the opposite side of the starting chain, hdc in 10 chains, 2hdc in last ch. join with first hdc. (28 hdc)

R2- ch1, turn, bphdc around each hdc. join with first bphdc. (28 bphdc)

R3- ch1, turn, working in the third loop of the hdc (see picture below), hdc in each hdc around. join with first hdc. (28 hdc)



R4-15- repeat R3. 

R16- ch1, turn, sc in the top of the first hdc (not in the third loop), *ch1, sk1, sc in the next hdc, repeat from * around to last hdc, ch1, sk1, join with sl st to the first hdc. (14sc)

R17- ch1, do not turn, sc in first sc, *ch2, sk ch sp, sc in next sc, repeat from * around, ch2, sk ch sp, join to first sc. CUT

Tie: 
Ch 46, sl st in 2nd ch from hook and remaining ch's. Cut leaving a long end for sewing the ends together. 

Weave through R16, meet ends and sew together (pic 1). Arrange the tie so that it acts like a loop to hang on a hook. (pics 2 and 3)
Picture 1

Picture 2

Picture 3

© Bizzy Crochet and Design 2020









Friday, May 29, 2020

Cable Owl Fingerless Mittens Pattern

Cable Owl Fingerless Mittens Pattern

by Elizabeth Mareno


Hey everyone!

I've been busy coming up with fun and easy patterns lately. This set of Cable Owl Fingerless Mittens is my latest. These are perfect for stash busting! You do not need more than a couple of ounces of worsted weight yarn, a #7 hook, and a couple of hours! The video also has instructions (starts @ 20:00) on how to customize these to fit smaller or larger hands (mine are short/medium). 

Materials used: 
Hobby Lobby I Love This Yarn #4 Worsted Weight Acrylic- 2 oz. 
#7/4.5mm hook
Large Eye needle to sew in ends. 

Gauge: 5 dc rows x 8 dc stitches = 2" x 2" 


Pattern Left Mitten: 

ch32, be careful to keep straight and join to make a circle
R1- ch1, sc in each chain around. (32) Join after each row

R2- ch2 (does not ct as a st), dc in join and each st around. (32)

R3- ch2, dc in join and next 14, ch2, sk2, dc in rem 15. (30)

R4- ch2, dc in join and next 11, sk2dc, fptrc ar next dc and 1st ch of ch2, working behind last 2st- fptrc ar 2 sk dc, working behind ch2 sp- fpdtrc ar 2 open dc from R19, sk remaining ch from ch2 and next dc, fptrc ar next 2, working in front of last 2 st- fptrc ar sk ch from ch2 & dc, dc in rem 12. (34)

R5- ch2, dc in join and next 11, fpdc ar next 4st, sk2 fpdtrc, fpdc ar next 4st, dc in rem 12. (32)

R6- ch2, repeat R5.

R7- ch2, dc in join and next 11, fpdc ar next 4st, sk2 fpdtrc, fpdc ar next 4st, dc in 5, ch4, sk 3, dc in last 4. (29) 

R8- ch2, dc in join and next 11, sk 2fpdc, fptrc ar next 2, working behind-fptrc ar 2skipped fpdc, sk next 2 open fpdc, fptrc ar next 2 fpdc, working in front- fptrc ar sk fpdc, dc in 5, 4dc in ch4, dc in last 4. (33)

R9- ch2, dc in join and next 11, fpdc ar 8, dc in 6, dc dec over next 2, dc in 5. (32)

R10- ch2, dc in join and next 11, sk 2fpdc, fptrc ar next 2, working behind-fptrc ar 2skipped fpdc, sk next 2 open fpdc, fptrc ar next 2 fpdc, working in front- fptrc ar sk fpdc, dc in rem 12. 

R11- ch2, dc in join and next 11, fpdc ar 2fpdc, dc in 4fpdc, fpdc ar next 2 fpdc, dc in 12. 

R12 & 13- ch2, dc in join and all stitches. (32)

R14 & 15- ch1, (fpdc ar dc, bpdc ar next dc) around. Join.

Cut off after R15. tuck ends. 

Pattern Right Mitten: 

Make the same as the Left mitten except for the following rows:

R7- ch2, dc in 4, ch4, sk 3, dc in 5,  fpdc ar next 4st, sk2 fpdtrc, fpdc ar next 4st, dc in rem 12. 

R8- ch2, dc in 4, 4dc in ch4, dc in 5, sk 2fpdc, fptrc ar next 2, working behind-fptrc ar 2skipped fpdc, sk next 2 open fpdc, fptrc ar next 2 fpdc, working in front- fptrc ar sk fpdc, dc in the last 12. (33)

R9- ch2, dc in 5, dc dec over next 2, dc in 6, fpdc ar 8, dc in 12. 


© Bizzy Crochet and Design 2020

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Happy Scrappy Hotpad Picture Tutorial

Hey everyone, I have been going through some old patterns and tutorials that I made years ago and I have found a few that I thought might be helpful. This is the "Happy Scrappy Hotpad" or "Magic Potholder" pattern in a picture tutorial. I have also created a video tutorial for this same pattern. You can find that here on YouTube

Update: I've started chaining 41 because I like the size better!






















Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Making the Exeter Gansey Cardigan- Behind the Scenes

Making the Exeter Gansey Cardigan*, which is part of Annie's Signature Design series for the Fall/Winter 2019 season, was obvious to me the minute I saw it. I knew I had to make it. So, I got a copy of the pattern, did a few blog posts giving everyone the information they needed if they wanted to join in with me, and a group of us got together on Sundays and Wednesdays in November and December for LIVE videos on my Bizzy Crochet business page and made the sweater together. I think only a couple of people actually worked on it, but we had lots of good chats and visiting regardless. All of the videos are still on my Bizzy Crochet page under the videos tab. They take you all the way from start to finish just in case you need a little support.

As you can see, the pattern is filled to the brim with lots of gorgeous texture. And I'll be honest, even I was intimidated by how many different stitches were represented. I was worried that I would somehow screw it up and it wouldn't turn out like the picture. But, I shouldn't have worried. The stitches are very, very basic when they are broken down into sections, which this pattern does throughout. It is a three-section repeat with raised horizontal bars in between created by doing the crab stitch in the front loop only of the previous row. It takes a few rows of them to get really comfortable doing them. But, as with any stitch you repeat over and over, comfort does come with that stitch eventually. You will feel like you can do anything after you complete this sweater. 

On the blocking boards. I blocked every piece of this pattern to the recommended measurements. I did make sure I was on the gauge before starting the pattern, so it wasn't difficult to block. I ended up a hook size smaller than the pattern called for- so make sure you do a gauge swatch! I have a blog post here that will help with that for this pattern. 

The next picture shows the front and back pieces sewn together at the shoulders and sides after blocking. The blocking helps the stitches to stand out better and makes my edges nice and straight for assembly. (I wet-blocked all my pieces.)

After the sleeves were set in, but before I started crocheting the collar. The flow and fit of the sweater were already perfect. My daughter was home for a quick weekend visit and I had her try it on like this and it fit her perfectly. All I had left to do was put on the collar. 


The collar was completely different construction from the sweater and was worked on the front band as a whole, not as a separate piece that was sewn on later. This made it a bit of a heavy challenge toward the end. I figured out that I had over 5,000 stitches in the collar alone by the time I was done. This sweater is no joke! It's as heavy as a blanket, but that makes it perfect for that cold Northern weather my daughter lives in Michigan. 

The next pictures are of the sweater on my mannequin. I had to get some pictures of the completed project in my garden before sending it North. In total, this sweater took me just over two months to crochet. But, this was also being worked on over the Christmas and New Year holiday break, so there were several weeks it never got touched. I would say that if I were to just sit down and work on this, it would take me 3 to 4 weeks, including the blocking time. It is definitely a labor of love.





In my head, I kept telling myself I would never make this sweater again. But, now that I've had a week or two away from it...I would. I would make this sweater again. It's not difficult to make. The repetition of the pattern just hums along after a bit. The instructions for sizing are perfectly clear. If you do a gauge swatch before starting, (be more concerned about the width than the height because you will control that with the repeats) then you will have plenty of yarn if you buy the yardage for your size. (I made an XL and had half a skein leftover of the yarn I purchased.) I think what took me so long was "second side syndrome" sort of like "second sock syndrome". I had fun doing the first one (side), but now I have to do it again! haha. 

Nevertheless, I did complete the sweater and with just enough time for my daughter, Stefani, to use it this winter in Michigan. The following pictures are of her. Her friend Jade of @_jade_photography_ on IG took these lovely pictures. They are so artsy and pretty! Thank you for being my model, Stefani, and thank you for the lovely pictures, Jade!







If you read all the way through...thank you for hanging out with me! I hope you feel inspired to make your own Exeter Gansey Cardigan*, and if you do, I hope you let me know and share your progress with me!! I would love to see your work and help you with any questions if you have them. I'm always here to cheer you on!

I have another make-along coming up from the Spring Collection- here is the blog post if you would like to join me!

*Links marked with asterisks are affiliate links. If you use one of my links to make a purchase it won't cost you any more, but the company may give me a small bit of money back which helps me pay for the free content on my blog. Thank you for your support!

A Celebration Sale

Hey all,  I just wanted to let you know that from 9/9/20 to 9/30/20 I am having a 30% off sale on all* of my patterns on my website. This is...